American Liverleaf (Hepatica americana)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
American Liverleaf
Hepatica americana
Ranunculaceae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    A tea made from the leaves is laxative[222]. It is used in the treatment of fevers, liver ailments and poor indigestion[222]. At one time it became a cult medicine as a liver tonic and 200,000 kilos of dried Hepatica leaves were used in 1883 alone[222]. Externally, the tea is applied as a wash to swollen breasts[222].

  • Edible Use

    None known

  • Cautionary Notes

    Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, most plants in this family are poisonous. This toxicity is usually of a low order and the toxic principle is destroyed by heat or by drying[4, 10, 19, 65].

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – sow in a moist soil in a shady position[1]. The stored seed requires stratification for about 3 weeks at 0 – 5¡c. Germination takes 1 – 12 months at 10¡c. It is probably worthwhile sowing the seed as soon as it is ripe in a shady position in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division just as the leafless plant comes into flower in late winter. Replant immediately into their permanent positions.
Prefers a deep light soil with leafmold[200]. Grows well on limey woodland soils in half shade, though it also succeeds in deep shade and in full sun[1]. Plants resent root disturbance and should be placed in their permanent positions as soon as possible[188]. This species is closely related to H. acutiloba[200]. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants, especially legumes[54].
Eastern N. America – Nova Scotia to Minnesota, south to Florida, Georgia and Missouri

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.