American Nightshade (Solanum americanum)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
American Nightshade
Solanum americanum
Solanaceae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    None known

  • Edible Use

    Young leaves – cooked. The leaves contain about 6990mg of beta carotene per 100g[173]. Caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity.

    Fruit – cooked. It should be used only when fully ripe[173]. Caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity.

  • Cautionary Notes

    Although no specific mention of the leaves being toxic has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where many if not all the members have poisonous leaves. The immature fruit is poisonous[173].

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – sow spring in a greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out after the last expected frosts.
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will succeed in Britain, though it should be possible to grow it as a spring-sown annual. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Succeeds in most soils[1].
S. America.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.