Black Knapweed (Centaurea nigra)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Black Knapweed
Centaurea nigra
Compositae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    The roots and seeds are diaphoretic, diuretic, tonic and vulnerary[4, 61]. The plant once had a very high reputation as a healer of wounds[4].

  • Edible Use

    Flower petals – raw. Added to salads[183].

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – sow April in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer. Division in autumn. Very easy, larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the summer or following spring. This should be done at least once every three years in order to maintain the vigour of the plant. Basal cuttings in spring. Harvest the shoots when they are about 10 – 15cm long with plenty of underground stem. Pot them up into individual pots and keep them in light shade in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the summer.
Succeeds in ordinary garden soil[1, 200]. Prefers a well-drained fertile soil and a sunny position[200]. Tolerates dry, low fertility and alkaline soils[200]. Established plants are tolerant of considerable neglect, thriving and even self-sowing in dense weed growth[K]. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer[233].
Western Europe, including Britain, from Spain to Norway, east to Germany and Switzerland.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.