Black Sagebrush (Artemisia nova)

Shrub
A. arbuscula. Nutt.
Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Black Sagebrush
Artemisia nova
Compositae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    A decoction of the leaves is used in the treatment of coughs, colds and headaches[61, 257].

  • Edible Use

    None known

  • Cautionary Notes

    Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people[222].

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse in a very free-draining soil, but make sure that the soil does not dry out. Germination usually takes place in 1 – 2 weeks in a warm greenhouse[164]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter, planting them out in late spring or early summer. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Division in spring or autumn.
Easily grown in a well-drained circumneutral or slightly alkaline loamy soil, preferring a sunny position. This species has some affinity for calcareous soils[164]. Established plants are very drought tolerant[200]. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil[245]. Unlike several closely related species, this plant does not layer or sprout from the stump if it is cut back[164]. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[200]. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer[233].
Western N. America – Washington to California.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.