Burr Marigold (Bidens tripartita)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Burr Marigold
Bidens tripartita
Compositae

Yields a black dye[178]. The part of the plant that is used is not specified.

The burning herb repels insects and flies[268].

The flowers yield a yellow dye of indifferent quality when alum is used as a mordant[4, 115, 268].

  • Medicinal Use

    Burr marigold is little used as a medicine nowadays, but it was once esteemed for its styptic properties being used to quickly staunch blood flow – it was often used to treat uterine haemorrhage and conditions producing blood in the urine[254].

    The whole plant is antiseptic, aperient, astringent, diuretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, narcotic, sedative, styptic and sudorific[4, 61, 165, 218]. It is an excellent remedy for ruptured blood vessels and bleeding of any kind, and is of benefit to people with consumption[4]. It is used internally to treat bladder and kidney problems, blood in the urine, uterine bleeding, ulcerative colitis and peptic ulcers[238, 254]. Externally, it is used in the treatment of alopecia[238]. It is usually combined with a carminative herb such as ginger when used to treat digestive tract ailments[254].

    The plant is harvested as it comes into flower and is dried for later use[238].

  • Edible Use

    Young leaves – cooked[105, 177, 183].

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – sow in situ during early spring and only just cover the seed. So long as the soil does not dry out, the seed usually germinates in 2 – 3 weeks at 15¡c[134].
Succeeds in any moderately fertile damp to wet soil in full sun[200, 238]. The flowering heads smell like rosin or cedar when they are burnt[4]. The seed coats have reflexed prickles which allow them to adhere to clothing, animal fur etc[4]. When growing on the edge a pond, these seeds have been known to kill goldfish by adhering to their gills[4].
Most of Europe, including Britain, north to 63¡, east to W. Asia.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.