Club Moss (Lycopodium serratum)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Club Moss
Lycopodium serratum
Lycopodiaceae

The following uses are for L. clavatum. They quite possibly also apply to this species[K].

The spores are water repellent and can be used as a dusting powder to stop things sticking together[106, 171]. They are also used as a talcum powder and for dressing moulds in iron foundries[74]. They can also be used as explosives in fireworks and for artificial lightning[46, 57, 102, 171, 213].

The plant can be used as a mordant in dyeing[172].

The stems are made into matting[46].

  • Medicinal Use

    A decoction of the plant is antispasmodic and diuretic, it is also used in the treatment of irregular menstruation[218].

    The spores of this plant are dusted on wounds or inhaled to stop bleeding noses. They can also be used to absorb fluids from injured tissues[213, 218].

    The spores can be used as a dusting powder to prevent pills sticking together[213].

  • Edible Use

    None known

  • Cautionary Notes

    The plant contains lycopodine, which is poisonous by paralysing the motor nerves[21, 218]. It also contains clavatine which is toxic to many mammals[218]. The spores, however, are not toxic[21].

Cultivation & Habitat

Spores – best sown as soon as they are ripe on the surface of a humus-rich sterilized soil. Keep the compost moist, preferably by putting a plastic bag over the pot. Pot on small clumps of plantlets as soon as they are large enough to handle and keep humid until they are well established. Do not plant outside until the ferns are at least 2 years old and then only in a very well sheltered position. The spores are generally produced in abundance but are difficult to grow successfully[200]. Layering of growing tips[200].
We have very little cultivation information on this species and do not know if it will succeed outdoors in Britain. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Thrives in a rough spongy peat in a shady position[1]. Requires a humid atmosphere[200]. Terrestrial members of this genus are hard to establish. The roots are delicate and liable to rot, most water being absorbed through the foliage[200]. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer[233]. Although looking more like a moss, this genus is closely related to the ferns[200].
E. Asia – China.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.