Devil’s Horsewhip (Achyranthes aspera)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Devil's Horsewhip
Achyranthes aspera
Amaranthaceae

The ash from the burnt plant, often mixed with mustard oil and a pinch of salt, is used as a tooth powder for cleaning teeth[272].

The dried twigs are used as toothbrushes[272].

The ash of the burnt plant is a rich source of potash. It is used for washing clothes[272].

  • Medicinal Use

    One of the more important mdicinal herbs of Nepal, it is widely used in the treatment of a range of complaints.

    Ophthalmic[152].

    The root is astringent, diuretic and antispasmodic[152, 178, 272]. It is used in the treatment of dropsy, rheumatism, stomach problems, cholera, skin diseases and rabies[152, 272].

    The juice extracted from the root of this plant, mixed with the root of Urena lobata and the bark of Psidium guajava, is used in the treatment of diarrhoea and dysentery[272].

    The plant is astringent, digestive, diuretic, laxative, purgative and stomachic[272]. The juice of the plant is used in the treatment of boils, diarrhoea, dysentery, haemorrhoids, rheumatic pains, itches and skin eruptions[272].

    The ash from the burnt plant, often mixed with mustard oil and a pinch of salt, is used as a tooth powder for cleaning teeth[272]. It is believed to relieve pyorrhea and toothache[272].

    The leaf is emetic and a decoction is used in the treatment of diarrhoea and dysentery[272]. A paste of the leaves is applied in the treatment of rabies, nervous disorders, hysteria, insect and snake bites[272].

  • Edible Use

    Leaves – cooked[144, 177]. Used as a spinach substitute[179].

    Seed – cooked[144, 177]. he seeds are said to be eaten with milk in order to check hunger without loss of body weight[272].

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – sow spring in situ.
Cultivated as a food crop in China[179]. See also [240] and [50].
E. Asia – Himalayas to Australia.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.