Flax-Leaved Daphne (Daphne gnidium)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Flax-Leaved Daphne
Daphne gnidium
Thymelaeaceae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    The plant contains toxic compounds that are being investigated for anti-leukaemia effects[238].

  • Edible Use

    None known

  • Cautionary Notes

    All parts of the plant are poisonous[76]. Skin contact with the sap can cause dermatitis in some people[200].

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – best sown in a greenhouse as soon as it is ripe with the pot sealed in a polythene bag to hold in the moisture. Remove this bag as soon as germination takes place[164]. The seed usually germinates better if it is harvested ‘green’ (when it has fully developed but before it dries on the plant) and sown immediately. Germination should normally take place by spring, though it sometimes takes a further year. Stored seed is more problematic. It should be warm stratified for 8 – 12 weeks at 20¡c followed by 12 – 14 weeks at 3¡c. Germination may still take another 12 months or more at 15¡c[164]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle. Grow the plants on in the greenhouse for their first winter and then plant out in spring after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Root cuttings, December in a greenhouse.
Prefers a well-drained but moisture-retentive slightly acid to slightly alkaline soil[200]. A good sandy loam suits most members of the genus[11]. This species is not very hardy in Britain, tolerating temperatures down to about -5¡c, it should succeed outdoors in the milder areas of the country[238]. Plants are resentful of root disturbance and should be planted into their permanent positions as soon as possible[188]. The flowers, which are produced in terminal clusters, are sweetly scented[245].
S. Europe, N. Africa and W. Asia.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.