Flowering Rush (Butomus umbellatus)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Flowering Rush
Butomus umbellatus
Butomaceae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    None known

  • Edible Use

    Tuber – cooked[5, 46, 61, 100, 177]. It should be peeled and the rootlets removed[179]. The root can also be dried and ground into a powder[179], it can then be used as a thickener in soups etc, or be added to cereal flours when making bread[2]. It contains more than 50% starch[13].

    Seed[1, 2, 5, 177]. No more details are given, but the seed is very small and fiddly to use[K].

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – best surface-sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe, it usually germinates in the spring. The seed quickly loses its vitality if it is not kept moist[200]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a tray of water in the cold frame, planting them out into their permanent positions in early summer. Division in spring[188]. Very easy, larger clumps can be planted direct into their permanent positions. It is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are well rooted before planting them out in the summer.
Requires a sunny position[200]. A plant of wet habitats, it succeeds in wet soils and in water up to 30cm deep[24, 56]. A very ornamental plant[2]. The flowers have a scent of bitter almonds[245].
Most of Europe, including Britain, and temperate Asia.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.