Giant Vetch (Vicia gigantea)

Perennial
V. nigricans gigantea. (Hook.)Lassetter.&Gunn.
Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Giant Vetch
Vicia gigantea
Leguminosae

An infusion of the roots has been used as a tonic hair wash and anti-dandruff treatment[257].

  • Medicinal Use

    The roots are laxative[257]. An infusion of the roots has been used as a tonic hair wash and anti-dandruff treatment[257].

  • Edible Use

    Young seed – raw or cooked[256]. The seeds are produced in pods 2 – 5cm long, each pod containing 3 – 4 round seeds the size of small peas[256]. They are eaten, when young, like green peas[2, 105, 118, 161], the flavour even of young seeds is rather strong, like old garden peas[256]. Some native North American Indian tribes regarded the seeds as poisonous, though other tribes would eat them as a snack. The pods were harvested when green and then roasted in an open fire until the pods started to split open. The seeds were then removed and eaten[256].

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Pre-soak the seed for 24 hours in warm water and then sow in situ in spring or autumn.
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Prefers a fairly heavy loam but succeeds in a sunny position in most soils that are well-drained[200]. Grows well in heavy clay soils.
Western N. America – Alaska to California.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.