Great Masterwort (Astrantia major)

Perennial
A. biebersteinii. A. carinthiaca. A. carniolica. non Wulf. A. trifida.
Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Great Masterwort
Astrantia major
Umbelliferae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    A decoction of the root is purgative[7]. The root is harvested in summer to early autumn and can be dried for later use[7].

    An infusion of the whole plant is a gentle diuretic[7].

  • Edible Use

    None known

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe[200]. Sow stored seed as early in the year as you can obtain it. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. If you have sufficient seed then it can be sown in situ either as soon as it is ripe or in the following spring. Division in spring. Large clumps can be planted out straight into their permanent positions. Smaller clumps are best potted up and kept in a cold frame until they are growing away well and can then be planted out in the summer.
Prefers a fertile moisture-retentive soil[200]. Succeeds in most well-drained soils[233] in full sun or part shade[200, 233]. Succeeds in an open woodland and along the sides of streams so long as the soil is well above the water level[200]. Plants are hardy to at least -17¡c[200]. Plants spread by means of underground runners[233]. There are some named varieties, selected for their ornamental value[200]. The flowers are sometimes dried and used for winter decoration[200].
C. and E. Europe. Naturalized in Britain.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.