Japanese Snowball (Viburnum plicatum)

Shrub
V. tomentosum. Thunb. non Lam.
Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Japanese Snowball
Viburnum plicatum
Caprifoliaceae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    None known

  • Edible Use

    Fruit – raw or cooked.

    Young leaves – cooked[177]. Rather unpleasant[K].

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Germination can be slow, sometimes taking more than 18 months. If the seed is harvested ‘green’ (when it has fully developed but before it has fully ripened) and sown immediately in a cold frame, it should germinate in the spring[80]. Stored seed will require 2 months warm then 3 months cold stratification and can still take 18 months to germinate[113]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a cold frame or greenhouse. Plant out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer of the following year. Cuttings of soft-wood, early summer in a frame[200]. Pot up into individual pots once they start to root and plant them out in late spring or early summer of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 5 – 8 cm long with a heel if possible, July/August in a frame[78, 113]. Plant them into individual pots as soon as they start to root. These cuttings can be difficult to overwinter, it is best to keep them in a greenhouse or cold frame until the following spring before planting them out[113]. Cuttings of mature wood, winter in a frame. They should root in early spring – pot them up when large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer if sufficient new growth is made, otherwise keep them in a cold frame for the next winter and then plant them out in the spring. Layering of current seasons growth in July/August. Takes 15 months[78].
An easily grown plant, it succeeds in most soils but is ill-adapted for poor soils and for dry situations[1]. It prefers a deep rich loamy soil in sun or semi-shade[11, 200]. Best if given shade from the early morning sun in spring[200]. A very hardy plant, tolerating temperatures down to about -25¡c. Plants are surface-rooting and are very susceptible to damage by hoeing, drought or water-logging. A section of top growth will often die back if the roots are damaged, in severe cases this will lead to the death of the plant[202]. A very ornamental plant, there are many named varieties[182, 202]. The type species is actually a sterile garden form. The true wild species is often referred to as V. plicatum tomentosum. (Thunb.)Miq. Plants take about 5 years from planting out before they produce fruit[202]. Fruit production can be erratic[202]. Plants are self-incompatible and need to grow close to a genetically distinct plant in the same species in order to produce fruit and fertile seed[11, 200].
E. Asia – China, Japan.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.