Lesser Dodder (Cuscuta epythymum)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Lesser Dodder
Cuscuta epythymum
Convolvulaceae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    Lesser dodder is considered to be a valuable though little used herbal remedy that supports the liver, being used for problems affecting the liver and gallbladder[254].

    The whole plant is antibilious, appetizer, carminative, cholagogue, mildly diuretic, hepatic, laxative and antiscorbutic[4, 218]. A decoction of the stems is used in the treatment of urinary complaints, kidney, spleen and liver disorders, jaundice, sciatica and scorbutic complaints[4]. It also has a reputation as an anticancer agent and as a specific for gout[218]. The plant should not be used by anyone suffering from haemorrhoids[7].

    A homeopathic remedy is made from the plant[7].

  • Edible Use

    None known

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in the autumn, by lodging it among the stems of a host plant[238].
This is a parasitic species that is devoid of leaves, roots or chlorophyll and so is totally dependant upon its host[238]. A climbing plant, it must be grown close to a host plant around which it will twine itself and which it will penetrate with suckers in order to obtain nutriment[238, 245]. The flowers emit a remarkably sweet perfume that is especially pronounced towards evening[245].
Europe, including Britain, from Norway to Spain and east to the Caucasus and central Asia.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.