Nepalese Raspberry (Rubus nepalensis)

Shrub
R. barbatus. R. nutans. non Vest. R. nutantiflorus.
Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Nepalese Raspberry
Rubus nepalensis
Rosaceae

A purple to dull blue dye is obtained from the fruit[168].

An excellent ground-cover plant, forming a quite effective weed-suppressing mulch[K].

  • Medicinal Use

    None known

  • Edible Use

    Fruit – raw or cooked[1, 105]. A very well flavoured and reasonably sized raspberry with just a little sourness[K]. It generally fruits well in the garden, though there are some forms that produce very little fruit, or poorly shaped fruits[K].

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – requires stratification, is best sown in early autumn in a cold frame. Sow stored seed as early as possible in the year in a cold frame and stratify for a month at 3¡c if sowing later than February. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a cold frame. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring of the following year. Tip layering in July. Plant out in autumn. Division in early spring. Very easy, the plants can be divided successfully at almost any time of the year. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found it best to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in a lightly shaded position in a cold frame, planting them out once they are well established in the summer.
Easily grown in a good well-drained loamy soil in sun or semi-shade[1, 11, 200]. Prefers a sheltered semi-shady position[11]. Plants survive considerable neglect, they can grow and spread in long grass though they do not fruit well in such a position[K]. Plants are not very drought tolerant[K]. The Nepalese raspberry is a very ornamental plant, though it loses some of its leaves in a cold winter and can look a little bedraggled at this time[K]. It is also unhappy in exposed maritime situations and in a sunny position in very hot summers. A report that this species is not hardy in zones colder than 9 is very questionable, the plant has survived quite hard frosts with us in Cornwall and grows happily at Kew Gardens[K]. There is also a clump growing successfully in a sheltered position in the semi-shade of trees at Cambridge Botanical gardens, this fruited quite well in the summer of 1996[K]. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus[200].
E. Asia – Himalayas.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.