Nipplewort (Lapsana communis)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Nipplewort
Lapsana communis
Compositae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    None known

  • Edible Use

    Young leaves and shoots – raw or cooked[2, 5, 17, 100]. They are best harvested before the plant comes into flower[9]. The leaves can be added to salads, cooked like spinach or added to soups and casseroles[9, 183]. They have a bitter or radish-like taste[183].

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – sow in situ during the spring or as soon as it is ripe and only just cover the seed. Plants usually self sow when they are well-sited.
A fairly common garden weed, nipplewort will maintain itself in the garden so long as it is given some disturbed soil in which to self-sow. It is a fairly tolerant plant that succeeds in most soils, so long as they are not too acid, and dislikes heavy shade. It was at one time cultivated as a vegetable[17].
Europe, including Britain, from Scandanavia south and east to N. Africa, western and central Asia.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.