Sea Celery (Apium prostratum)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Sea Celery
Apium prostratum
Umbelliferae

Used for pads to make canoes watertight.

  • Medicinal Use

    None known

  • Edible Use

    Leaves – a salty taste, it is used as a flavouring in soups etc or as a garnish in a similar way to parsley[193]. The leaves can also be eaten raw but have a very strong flavour[193]. The stems can be blanched and used like celery[154], but they are small and fibrous so are not very worthwhile[193].

    Root. No further details.

    Seed – used as a flavouring in soups etc.

  • Cautionary Notes

    Skin contact with the sap is said to cause photo-sensitivity and/or dermatitis in some people[218].

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – sow spring in a greenhouse. Germination can be a bit slow, taking a month or more. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division in spring.
Prefers a rich moist soil with some shade in summer. The crushed leaves smell strongly of celery[193]. This plant used to be known as A. australe, along with a New Zealand form and a S. American form. Most botanists now only apply that name to the S. American form, the New Zealand form has been moved to A. filiforme (syn A, prostratum filiforme) whilst this Australian form is now known as A. prostratum[44, 193]. This plant has been suggested as having the potential to be bred as a cultivated vegetable[193].
Australia – New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.