Silver Banksia (Banksia marginata)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Silver Banksia
Banksia marginata
Proteaceae

The bark contains 10% tannin.

This species has been used as a rootstock for propagating other members of the genus.

Wood – soft, easily worked, pinkish with a prominent grain. It is highly decorative but the plants tend to be gnarled and irregular thus limiting its use. Used for veneers, furniture etc.

  • Medicinal Use

    None known

  • Edible Use

    The flowers are filled with a sweet nectar which can be sucked directly or washed out with water to make a refreshing beverage[183, 193].

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – surface sow in an ericaceous compost as soon as the seed is ripe or as soon as it is obtained and do not exclude light. Seal the pot in a plastic bag until germination takes place, which can take 1 – 3 months or more at 20¡c[134]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in sand in a frame[200].
Requires a well-drained lime-free soil and a sunny position[1, 200]. Thrives in acid sandy loams[167, 200]. Prefers a pH between 6.3 and 6.5[200]. Plants are tolerant of damp soils and sea winds[260]. If this species is to be successfully cultivated, the soil should be low in nutrients, especially in nitrates and phosphates[200]. This species is not very cold-hardy, possibly tolerating temperatures down to around -5¡c[260]. Plants require greenhouse protection in most parts of Britain[1] but high-altitude forms could succeed outdoors in the mildest areas of the country[200]. This species hybridizes in the wild with B. integrifolia and B. conferta penicillata[200]. A good bee plant[154, 167].
Australia – New South Wales, S. Queensland, Victoria.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.