Small Vanilla Lily (Arthropodium minus)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Small Vanilla Lily
Arthropodium minus
Asphodelaceae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    None known

  • Edible Use

    Root – cooked. Rather watery with a slightly sweet or bitter flavour[193]. Plants produce about 4 – 5 tubers, each of which are up to 3cm long[193].

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – sow late winter in a cold greenhouse. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on for at least their first winter in a greenhouse. Plant out in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division in spring.
Prefers a well-drained sandy peaty loam in a warm, sheltered sunny position[200]. Succeeds in areas where temperatures seldom fall much below freezing so long as it is given a sunny sheltered position and a well-drained soil[200]. Plants are hardy to at least -7¡c in Australian gardens[157], though this cannot be translated directly to British gardens due to our cooler summers and colder longer and wetter winters. The plant has a strong scent of vanilla, this is especially noticeable on warm days[157].
Australia – New South Wales, Tasmania, Victoria.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.