Tall Thimbleweed (Anemone virginiana)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Tall Thimbleweed
Anemone virginiana
Ranunculaceae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    The root and seeds are astringent, emetic and expectorant[222]. A decoction of the roots was used in the treatment of TB, whooping cough and diarrhoea[222, 257].

    The root is pulverised and used as a wet poultice in the treatment of boils[213, 222, 257].

  • Edible Use

    None known

  • Cautionary Notes

    Although no records of toxicity have been seen for this species, it belongs to a family where many of the plants are poisonous. Some caution is therefore advised[K].

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe in the summer[1]. Surface sow or only just cover the seed and keep the soil moist. Sow stored seed as soon as possible in late winter or early spring. The seed usually germinates in 1 – 6 months at 20¡c[133]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on for at least their first year in a lightly shaded place in a greenhouse. When large enough, plant them out into their permanent positions in the spring. Division in late summer after the plant dies down.
Succeeds in ordinary garden soil but prefers a moist well-drained woodland soil[1, 200]. Prefers a moist peaty soil in some shade[187]. Tolerates drought during its summer dormancy[200]. Plants seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits[233]. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants, especially legumes[54].
Central and Eastern N. America – Nova Scotia to South Carolina, Kansas, Alberta and Arkansas.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.