ALAINN: “BEAUTIFUL, FINE, LOVELY”. (IRISH) OLD IRISH ÁLAIND‎

Pay what you will in our digital Shop. We have removed prices from all our non-personalized digital products. – Love, Kitty
Prefer FREE access to ALL digital products? Want to support the disclosure library? Become a Supporting Member Today.

Wild Pea (Pisum sativum elatius)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Wild Pea
Pisum sativum elatius
Leguminosae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    The seed is contraceptive, fungistatic and spermacidal[218]. The dried and powdered seed has been used as a poultice on the skin where it has an appreciable affect on many types of skin complaint including acne[7].

    The oil from the seed, given once a month to women, has shown promise of preventing pregnancy by interfering with the working of progesterone[218]. The oil inhibits endometrial development[240]. In trials, the oil reduced pregnancy rate in women by 60% in a 2 year period and 50% reduction in male sperm count was achieved[240].

  • Edible Use

    Seed – cooked or sprouted and eaten raw[2, 46, 61]. A good source of protein. The seeds of this sub-species tend to be of poorer quality than the species, being less rich in sugars. They also develop a hard seed coat as they mature which makes them less desirable for culinary use.

    Young leaves – cooked[177].

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Pre-soak the seed for 12 hours in warm water and sow it in situ from early to late spring. Germination should take place within 2 weeks.
Requires a well-drained moisture retentive soil[1, 16, 37]. Prefers a calcareous soil[37]. Prefers a pH in the range 6 to 7.5[200]. Prefers a rich loamy soil[1]. A light soil and a sheltered position is best for early sowings[1]. Peas have long been cultivated as a food crop and a number of distinct forms have emerged. This is the original form of the species and is still found growing wild in Turkey. Peas are good growing companions for radishes, carrots, cucumbers, sweet corn, beans and turnips[18, 20, 201]. They are inhibited by alliums, gladiolus, fennel and strawberries growing nearby[18, 20, 201]. There is some evidence that if Chinese mustard (Brassica juncea) is grown as a green manure before sowing peas this will reduce the incidence of soil-borne root rots[206]. This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[200]. When removing plant remains at the end of the growing season, it is best to only remove the aerial parts of the plant, leaving the roots in the ground to decay and release their nitrogen.
E. Asia.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.