Wind Flower (Anemone quinquefolia)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Wind Flower
Anemone quinquefolia
Ranunculaceae

None known

  • Medicinal Use

    Employed as a rubefacient in the treatment of rheumatism, gout and fevers, it is also used as a vesicant in the removal of corns[207].

  • Edible Use

    None known

  • Cautionary Notes

    An extremely acrid plant, even small doses causing a great disturbance of the stomach[207].

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe in the summer[1]. Surface sow or only just cover the seed and keep the soil moist. Sow stored seed as soon as possible in late winter or early spring. The seed usually germinates in 1 – 6 months at 15¡c[133]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in light shade in the greenhouse for at least their first year. When the plants are large enough, plant them out in the spring. Division in late summer after the plant dies down.
Succeeds in ordinary garden soil but prefers a moist well-drained woodland soil[1, 200]. Prefers a moist peaty soil in some shade[187]. Tolerates drought during its summer dormancy[200]. Hardy to at least -20¡c[187]. This species is closely related to A. nemorosa[200]. Plants seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits[233]. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants, especially legumes[54]. A good woodland plant[1, 187].
Eastern N. America – Nova Scotia to Georgia, western Ontario, Minnesota and Tennessee.

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.