Yellow Camomile (Anthemis tinctoria)

Common Name Latin Name Plant Family
Yellow Camomile
Anthemis tinctoria
Compositae

A distinctive yellow dye is obtained from the flowers[14, 17, 46, 61, 89, 169, 244].

  • Medicinal Use

    The whole plant is antispasmodic, diaphoretic, emetic, emmenagogue and vesicant[4]. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant[4]. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles and can also be applied to the bath water[4].The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings[222].

  • Edible Use

    None known

  • Cautionary Notes

    None known

Cultivation & Habitat

Seed – surface sow March/April in a greenhouse[134]. Do not allow the soil to dry out. Light aids germination. The seed usually germinates in 2 weeks at 20¡c[134]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer. Cuttings of soft wood early summer in a frame. Very easy[K]. Division in spring or autumn[200].
Prefers a well-drained sweet soil and a sunny position[1]. Grows well on chalk[187]. Plants succeed in maritime gardens[233]. Hardy to about -15¡c[200]. Another report says that it is hardy to about -25¡c[187]. This species has formerly been cultivated as a dye plant[61], the var. ‘Kelawayi’ is said to be the best form[169]. Plants are apt to over-flower and exhaust themselves. It is best to remove the flowering stems as soon as they stop flowering in order to stimulate the production of basal shoots for the following year[233].
Europe – Mediterranean. A casual in Britain[17].

Become ungovernable, break the chains of the matrix; grow and forage your own food and medicine.

*None of the information on this website qualifies as professional medical advice. Take only what resonates with your heart and use your own personal responsibility for what’s best for you. For more information [brackets] [000], see bibliography.